Maths and Art

When I was younger one of my passions was maths (it still is in some ways although my grasp of it gets more tenuous as time passes). Every so often it resurfaces, usually when I’m reading philosophy or doing something that involves statistics. Up til this point I haven’t found much of a pleasurable crossover between the art and mathematics – there’s an awful lot of those dreadful fractal art posters and for the people who don’t like those (basically everyone who isn’t daft) there’s Escher.

Perhaps ‘mathematical’ art is a flawed genre. Art, especially traditional disciplines like painting and sculpture, incorporates maths at the basic level and uses it as a framework or foundation for creativity. Things like perspective, ratio, proportion and pattern rely on mathematical sensibilities but aren’t reduced to lifelessness by it.

With that in mind here are a few pieces or work which I think have that quality of being inspired by mathematics but not constrained by it:

Andrea Mantegna - Lamentation over the Dead Christ (c.1480)

Andrea Mantegna - Lamentation over the Dead Christ (c.1480)

Fan vaulting, Sherbourne Abbey (15th century)

Fan vaulting, Sherbourne Abbey (15th century)

Dan Flavin - Untitled (to you, Heiner, with admiration and affection), 1973

Dan Flavin - Untitled (to you, Heiner, with admiration and affection), 1973 (photo courtesy of brandon shigeta)

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Advertisements